devoutfashion:

GREY, Nigerian Clothing Brand

Mark Wahlberg

thisaintnewblack:

therfbort:

howtobeafuckinglady:

herculeanluxe:

a racist
a homophobe
a white rapper

A triple threat

didn’t he blind a vietnamese man with a meathook

didn’t he physically assault an elderly black man too?

o. I guess his image as a Boston street tough is more than just good acting.

thetpr:

blackgirlsrpretty2:

yellawunn:

Back when I had my afro, I was bored so I put myself (right) in a pic with Angela Davis (left)…✊

one of the best photoshops I’ve ever seen

YOOOOOOOOOO

thetpr:

blackgirlsrpretty2:

yellawunn:

Back when I had my afro, I was bored so I put myself (right) in a pic with Angela Davis (left)…✊

one of the best photoshops I’ve ever seen

YOOOOOOOOOO

(via theakasha)

unfollower:

no see lesbians are not more accepted than gay men they’re more sexualized please do not get those 2 things confused

(via shakarlicious)

note-a-bear:

boo-meister:

note-a-bear:

Can this be my life, tho?

Who’s driving the car?

The Spirit of Jazz and the Knowledge of Impending Racism

note-a-bear:

boo-meister:

note-a-bear:

Can this be my life, tho?

Who’s driving the car?

The Spirit of Jazz and the Knowledge of Impending Racism

(via astoraea)

"oooooh, look at all that hair!"

— said to one with long hair, real or not. (via blackproverbs)

My life.

my-d1vineright:

thagoodthings:

brownbootyextract:

brownglucose:

my-d1vineright:

aceunibomber06:

vinebox:

All black people can relate to yah moms tripping like this

It’s like pledging

Real life

:-(

Geez

Please

its back

(via blackproverbs)

darvinasafo:

That last sentence though…

darvinasafo:

That last sentence though…

(via blackproverbs)

"Haha, Hell!"

— That shit ain’t funny muhfukka. African American Proverb (via noiresplendor)

(Source: blackproverbs, via blackproverbs)

theuppitynegras:

michelle-my-belle:

So, that’s over.
"An abusive man may embellish his childhood suffering once he discovers that it helps him escape responsibility. The National District Attorney’s Association Bulletin reported a revealing study that was conducted on another group of destructive men: child sexual abusers. The researcher asked each man whether he himself had been sexually victimized as a child. A hefty 67 percent of the subjects said yes. However, the researcher then informed the men that he was going to hook them up to a lie-detector test and ask them the same questions again. Affirmative answers suddenly dropped to only 29 percent. In other words, abusers of all varieties tend to realize the mileage they can get out of saying, ‘I’m abusive because the same thing was done to me.’"

— Lundy Bancroft, Why Does He Do That?: Inside the Minds of Angry and Controlling Men (via monobey)

(Source: blackarachnias, via afghangry)

siddharthasmama:

halaalpussy:

My hair finished dreading!!! This all happened naturally for all you ebony african americans of black descent who think white people hair cant dread. Im not being appropriative, this is me in my most natural state. :)

?!?!?!?!
i fucking cna’t

siddharthasmama:

halaalpussy:

My hair finished dreading!!! This all happened naturally for all you ebony african americans of black descent who think white people hair cant dread. Im not being appropriative, this is me in my most natural state. :)

?!?!?!?!

i fucking cna’t

image

(via murderwhitepeople)

"Books were (and still are) my way of understanding the world. When I felt like being a girl and being a nerd didn’t make sense in the same body, Hermione Granger was there to teach me better. When awkward middle school crushes threatened to overtake all my cognitive functions, Eragon flew me off on fantastical journeys that stretched my brain further than a braces-filled conversation with any boy ever could.

But devoted as I was to the universes hiding between the covers of my favorite books, I couldn’t help but start to wonder why I never read about people who looked like me. I didn’t see us at journalism competitions, on TV discussing New York Times bestsellers, or assigned on any syllabi. Did Black writers not exist? Or worse yet, were Black people just not worth reading and writing about? To have the one thing that makes sense to you in this world reject your existence almost entirely is no simple diss. It tells you your stories don’t matter, your voice is better off unused, your problems aren’t real. Or worse yet, that you are the problem.

For a long time, this forced me to reconsider my love affair with literature; unrequited love isn’t really my thing. I spent a long time avoiding books because I didn’t want to be antagonized even in a fantasy realm, to always be the nondescript footnote in someone else’s memoir. It was only after immersing myself in the words of Toni Morrison, Frederick Douglass, Junot Díaz, CLR James, Maya Angelou and other Black authors that I fell back into the warmth of literary intimacy."

Black nerds, escapism, and why we need more diverse books (via flockofsoul)

(Source: ethiopienne, via flockofsoul)